On this Day: ‘The Week’s Sports’

From the Alfreton and Belper Journal, 2nd December 1892:

The Week’s Sports

The football shown on Saturday by the different clubs was surprising and goes to show that football (like cricket) is a game upon which you cannot place much confidence as to the results, as the different matches lately played tend to show…

…Last Saturday Alfreton leapt out of the bucket and put another win to their credit, and this came when the least expected.  No one could have thought the Town would score two more points than their opponents last week who saw the teams previous to the commencement.  There were four of the Alphas team playing with the first, and whether it is owing to these four being included in the team that they gained their victory or no I cannot say.  Certain it is they had something to do with the result.  It was a pity the day was so unfavourable as the club are not having the best of gates, and it seems rather hard that they should receive so little support when they are proving themselves conquerors.  Many of the supporters thought there would be no match, as did also some of the first team players, in fact some were in bed while the play was on, and did not know anything of the affair until some considerable time after the match was over.  However, the Alphas were at hand and proved themselves equal to the task by their tactics and dash.  The Basford team were a tricky lot of fellows and played a fast game, but their defence is far from good, and it is chiefly owing to this defect that they were defeated on Saturday…

…Clay Cross journeyed to South Normanton and beat the home team by 4 goals to 2.  I have been in the company of the visitors lines man (Mr. Whitworth), and he tells me the language of the spectators was most disgusting I think the spectators ought to control their tongues a little…

…I am pleased to state that Chesterfield and Clay Cross have dispelled all the bitterness of rivalry that has existed between them , and Clay Cross are due at Chesterfield on Christmas Tuesday to face the “Crooked Spireites” in a friendly .  May the best team win.  Chesterfield have guaranteed Clay Cross £4 for the match.

Riddings received a severe beating at Ilkeston on Saturday.  Owing to the wet morning only nine of the team turned up, Wimbush and Brown being absent.  Starting with nine men, their misfortunes did not end there, Street straining his thigh after five minutes play and being of no further use to his side.  Partridge, the Riddings centre half-back, played a champion game, and was the best man on the field.  Burton also played a very good game.  Next Saturday Riddings visit Clay Cross, and have re-organised the team.  We shall see by the result whether it will be a success or not…

Lost again!  Belper Town three, Langley Mill four.  The best excuse to give for a losing team is they met better players.  I doubt it in this case.  Four to three leaves very little margin.  The ground at Langley Mill was in a terrible plight, pools of water and mud being plentiful.  Still I have a little excuse for Belper.  They had not the full team.  When the half-backs are absent it is like taking away the prop and down comes the whole structure.  Horrobin had promised up to Friday night to resume his place in the team.  Derby Junction got at him and he was tempted to Rotherham.  Jack Lynam could not go, and Green is on the sick list.  These three men would have won the match for Belper.  When the return is played I think there will be less croaking at Langley Mill than was the case last Saturday…

…I am reminded by a friend of a grand prize drawing Belper Town has arranged for Christmas on behalf of the funds of the club.  There are fifty prizes ranging from £3 3s. to two dozen of bitter beer.  Every little helps.  Who can tell what a stray ticket may do.  It is always the unexpected that happens.

RAMBLER        

We hold the Alfreton and Belper Journal on microfilm  – just ring to book a microfilm reader.

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Creepy House: creative models of Wingfield Manor

This week we have delivered the first of our 13 kids activity sessions as part of this year’s Summer Reading Challenge. In line with this year’s theme, Creepy House, the typically enthusiastic children and just as enthusiastic parents in New Mills and Glossop created some fantastic and eery models of Wingfield Manor.

All sessions are free of charge and the children are encouraged to enter their work into our competition to win a new book. All competition entries will be displayed in the gallery wall at the Record Office in Matlock from 2 September for visitors to vote for the best ones. Still to come…

Derbyshire’s own Creepy House – Wingfield Manor: 15th century mansion, 16th century prison, 17th century fort, 18th century ruin

Discover the secrets of Wingfield Manor ready to build and design your own model of this creepy house

                Newbold Library, Monday 12 August, 10.30am – 11.30am

                Creswell Library, Monday 12 August, 2.30pm-3.30pm

                Dronfield Library, Monday 19 August, 10.30am – 11.30am

                Alfreton Library, Thursday 29 August, 10.30am – 11.30am

Breaking News! Family histories jumbled in crash: Use the clues to put the families stories back together and create a history suitcase for the next generation

Craft session to get children thinking about their ancestry

                Long Eaton Library, Wednesday 14 August, 2.00pm-3.30pm

                Eckington Library, Monday 19 August, 2.00pm-3.30pm

                Chesterfield Library, Friday 23 August, 10.30am – 11.30am

                Ilkeston Library, Thursday 29 August, 2.00pm-3.30pm

A Century of My Village: What was your village like when Queen Victoria was on the throne?

Use old photographs to make your own pop-theatre of the village

                Melbourne Library, Wednesday 14 August, 10.30am – 11.30am

                Bolsover Library, Friday 23 August, 2.00pm-3.00pm

If you would like to book please contact the appropriate library. More information about the Summer Reading Challenge can be found at www.derbyshire.gov.uk/libraries or by contacting your local library.

On This Day: ‘District News’

From the Derby Mercury, 12th October 1881:

DISTRICT NEWS

CHESTERFIELD

Chesterfield was on Saturday night, for the first time, illuminated by the electric light.  The experimental operations proved very successful; and as the Corporation are hopelessly in conflict with the local gas company, it is probable that the electric light will be a permanent institution in Chesterfield.

ALFRETON

SINGULAR DEATH – John Shaw, the landlord of the New Inn, Greenhill lane, Alfreton, some three weeks ago was attempting to catch a wasp which was in the window of his house, when he stumbled and cut his wrist on a broken pane of glass.  He bled very much at the time, and from blood poisoning and the shock to his system he died on Wednesday.  It is not deemed necessary to hold an inquest.

The County Local Studies Library holds the Derby Mercury – just ring to book a microfilm reader.  If you have a Derbyshire library card you can also view 19th century issues of the newspaper online.

Latest recipe from Clara: Lobster Curry

Lobster CurryD7555/1 Clara Palmer-Morewood recipe book p83

Get fresh boiled lobsters and take as much of the meat, spawn, and head as weill be about a pound. Melt a table spoonful of butter in a stew pan, and add to it the lobster and two table spoonfuls of fish curry paste to be had of the oilmen (not powder) and one and a half wine glass of cold water; stew gently for fifteen minutes and it is done.

Le Papier de Nouvelle [The Paper of New]

Recipes from Clara for the Jubilee

Why not try some of these recipes from Clara’s book to help you celebrate the Jubilee this weekend. Here is a recipe for marmalade, keep an eye out for a light sponge cake and ginger beer

D7555/1, page 4Orange Marmalade

Cut the oranges in two, not throught the poles, but across, then with a spoon scrape out all the pulp taking care not to take away of the white part of the rind. Cut the orange peel into slices rather thin, put them in to water, you must change the water every day, till you find it has lost all bitterness, When you take them out of the water, weigh them & to every pound put a pound of loaf sugar, boil the orange peel till it becomes so ternder that you may put a straw through. As soon as you have taken the pulp from the oranges, you must pick out all the skins and pips and close it up till the peel’s prepared as above directed is boiled tender; you must put the sugar to the juice and boil it up before you put the peel to it, skin it from the dross, then put in the peel and let it simmer gently over a slow fire till you find the sugar has entered the peel.

Don’t forget to let us know how you get on when making this dish, and send us your Jubilee pictures.

Another recipe from Clara’s recipe book: Rabbit Soup

D7555/1 Clara Palmer-Morewood recipe book, Alfreton Hall“To four quarts of Water, put a couple of old Rabbitscut into small pieces, the lean part of a neck of mutton, a shank of ham a few Turnips, a bunch of sweet herbs, or [unknown], season it with a very little Mace, Cayenne Pepper. Thicken it with butter and Flour and as much cream as will make it a nice colour, not very white, it should be made the day before it is used, all the fat may be skimmed off, it ought to simmer by the fire seven of eight hours covered up as it may not away too much”

(click image to enlarge)

Early Bakewell Pudding Recipe

Here is the recipe for a Bakewell Pudding discovered in the recipe book of Clara Palmer-Morewood, one time resident of Alfreton Hall. Dated as it is in 1837 it is possibly the first ever documented version of the almond dessert which local legend claims was invented by accident in the 1860s. Why not have a go at making the famous local dish yourself to this unique 1837 recipe? And don’t forget to let us know how you get on, and send your pictures in (Record.Office@derbyshire.gov.uk) and we’ll put them up here.

D7555/1 Clara Palmer-Morewood recipe book, Alfreton HallIt reads: “Lay a Puff paste over a tin, open tart mould, put into it two dozen raisins stoned and chopped fine (Dryed cherries would be better) Almonds cut thin, candied orange peel, or any kind of Preserve. Beat well the yolks of four eggs, & the white of one, add ¼ lb of clarified butter, & some powdered sugar, beat all together & fill up the mould with the mixture, (Lemon would improve it) bake it in a slow oven – to be eaten cold & sprinkled over with powdered sugar. 1837”

(click image to enlarge)

We will be adding more recipes from Clara’s book (including some medicinal and gardening “recipes”) over the coming weeks, so keep an eye for more delicious dishes to try your hand at

Alfreton Local History Open Day

Two pictures of participants in the Local History Open Day at Alfreton Library last week.  We had a fun day, and the event’s organisers reckon we had sixty visitors, which means it was time well spent as well.