Advent Calendar – Day 9

Is there anything new to learn behind door number 9? We hope so…

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Roll of Honour of the 8th Co. Imperial Yeomanry, 4th Battalion, Derbyshire contingent, during the Boer War (Ref: D6160/1)

The Roll of Honour records the names of the seven officers and 128 non-commissioned officers and men of the contingent, as well as the names of those killed in action, taken prisoner, wounded or died of disease. It is decorated with illustrations, including photographic portraits of the seven officers and a photograph of the 1st Company of the Imperial Yeomanry at Winburg. It is also illustrated with portraits of Queen Victoria, King Edward VIII and Queen Alexandra, a map of the area of conflict in South Africa and a small painting of a rifleman on horseback.

About the company: enrolled on 9 January 1900, it left Derby for South Africa on 21 January 1900. It fought in various engagements, numbering 73 in total, including at Thaba Nichu, Biddulphsberg, Wittebergen and Reitz. It left Capetown for England on 7 May 1901 and arrived in Derby on 9 June 1901, being disbanded the next day.

D6160-1 Boer War Roll of Honour

D6160-1 Boer War Roll of Honour

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Calmview is online

In my last post about catalogues, I suggested we might be looking at mid-February for the completion of an upgrade on our catalogue browser. And, OK, it’s the last day of February, but we are there.

One of the benefits of the new browser (Calmview) is that it allows us to upload images and attach them to catalogue entries. At the time of posting, we have only 5, but there will be more. Our trial of this function begins with images relating to World War I. That hyperlink will take you to an up-to-date overview of catalogue entries that have associated images, so if you click the same thing in a few days’ time, you should see more there. To view an image, just click on the particular entry.

I hope the idea of using hyperlinks is one we can work with more. For instance, in response to a specific request I can add a link here to the Froggatt of Froggatt collection, D3331.

Another useful thing is that we can add documents, which means we can post wordprocessed versions of lists that we haven’t added to the catalogue yet. A random example is D5262, a collection of Monyash title deeds.

Further posts on this kind of caper will follow. Thanks.

Explore Your Archive – Prisoners of War

I first became aware that there had been Napoleonic prisoners in Derbyshire when I came across an unusual gravestone at St Mary and All Saints church, Chesterfield, aka the Crooked Spire.  The inscription translated as ‘In memory of Francois Raingeard, thirty years of age, Prisoner of War, died 1oth March 1812’ and bore the message ‘Stop Traveller!  If thro’ Life’s journey, Sympathy Has found a seat in thy Breast; thou’ll drop a pitying tear to the memory of one who…’; the last line started ‘In Friendship…’, but the rest had worn away.

This wasn’t the first time there had been prisoners of war in Derbyshire.  During the Seven Years’ War with France, the Victoria County History (Vol 2) states that 300 French prisoners were sent to Derby in July 1759.  Apparently the churchwardens of Derby All Saints made an “absurdly boastful and vainglorious entry” in their books concluding:

Their behaviour at first was impudent and insolent; and at all times vain and effeminate; and their whole deportment Light and Unmanly; and we may venture to say from our observation and knowledge of them that in any future war, this Nation has nothing to fear from them as an Enemy.  During their abode here, the road from this place to Parliament was by an Act of Parliament repair’d; the part from St. Mary’s Bridge (which by reason of the floods was impassible) being greatly raised.  Numbers of these people were daily employ’d, who work’d in their Bag Whigs, Pigtails, Ruffles, &c., a matter which afforded no small merriment.  But to their Honour let it be remembered, yet scarce an Act of Fraud or Theft was committed by any of them during their stay amongst us.    

Whilst prisoners of war from the lower ranks were held in prisons or on prison ships, officers were placed on a parole of honour in which they promised not to leave or escape from the town they were sent to.  Derbyshire’s central geographic position made it an ideal place to hold the men.  Our local studies library copy (940.27) of part of the National Archives’ general entry book of French prisoners of war on parole shows that from December 1803-July 1812 there were 172 prisoners on parole at Ashbourne and from November 1803-June 1811 there were over 400 held at Chesterfield.  The parish registers for Chesterfield show that aswell as Frenchmen there were at least a few Polish, Swiss, German, Italian and Hungarian prisoners too.

D302 Z/W 1 Weekly accounts, December 1812

D302 Z/W 1 Weekly accounts, December 1812

We have at the Record Office a bound volume of letters, accounts and reports (to the Transport Board) by John Langford (D302 Z/W 1) who was appointed as the agent for the care of parole prisoners at Ashbourne in March 1812.  The accounts and the discharge information can sometimes record prisoner’s names, the name of the prize i.e. from which vessel or place the prisoner was captured, whether the prize was a man of war, privateer or merchant vessel, what rank the prisoner held, and in some records the date of the beginning of their parole at Ashbourne, their date of discharge and how much they were paid.  One particular list which records prisoners at Ashbourne who hadn’t been held on parole or in prison anywhere else in the country, also records details of their age, height, hair colour, eye colour, face shape, complexion, figure, and any wounds or distinguishing marks.

D302 Z/W 1 Accounts of subsistence paid, 1812

D302 Z/W 1 Accounts of subsistence paid, 1812

Whilst the papers don’t reveal that much about their day-to-day activities, there are some letters which let us glimpse into individual lives, such as one from 26th November 1812 giving the account of a Monsieur Frohart who was judged to be in a state of insanity.  He was lodging with a Mr Mellor in the town and it was Mellor who reported to Langford that Frohart, having been restless and singing and making a noise the preceding night, appeared deranged the next morning and ran into the street only half-dressed and broke the windows of several neighbouring properties.  Apparently a couple of years previously he had been in a similar state whilst being on parole in Chesterfield.

Other letters record the various escapes of prisoners, such as Jacques Perroud, the captain of the privateer the ‘Phoenix’, who ran away in the night in April 1812 and was believed to be heading to the Kent coast.  A physical description of him is included and it also reports what he could be wearing, topped by a new hat with a narrow crown, broadish brim, a ribbon and a small white buckle.  Captain Perroud left behind at his lodgings a trunk, four small French dictionaries, three pairs of cloth pantaloons, four old cotton shirts and two cotton pillow cases.

Between 1803 and 1815, around ten prisoners (all men on parole at Chesterfield) appear in the Quarter Sessions Calendars of Prisoners, though I’m sure the actual figure was much higher.  Half of them are being tried on charges of breaking or exceeding their parole and the other half are up on bastardy charges for fathering illegitimate children.  There are at least twelve prisoners of war, including Francois Raingeard, buried in the Crooked Spire churchyard.  From 1806 onwards there are approx. ten marriages of prisoners of war to local women and about eighteen baptisms of children of prisoners, either with wives who were also taken as prisoners or women they had met and married in Chesterfield, and also a few illegitimate children.  

The Ashbourne St Oswald registers seem to show that one local family was particularly welcoming:  15th August 1808, Vincent Pierre Fillion, a French Prisoner of War, married Hannah Whitaker, spinster; 7th May 1810, Louis Hugand, a French prisoner, married Mary Whittaker, spinster; 30th December 1811, Peter/Pierre Dupre, Prisoner of War in Ashbourne, married Elizabeth Whittaker, spinster; 26th November 1812, Otto Ernst d’Heldreich, Prisoner of War, married Margaret Whittaker, spinster. 

Whilst a few remained in Derbyshire, most of the prisoners of war, and their families, eventually returned to mainland Europe.  But aswell as the legacy of a method of glove-making which carried on and thrived in Chesterfield during the nineteenth century, as the story goes it was a French prisoner who first introduced the recipe for what is known as Ashbourne Gingerbread, which is still made and sold in the town two hundred years later.

EYA-poster-poetry-workshop

Explore Your Archive – On This Day: French Prisoners of War

From the Derby Mercury, 14th November 1811:

On Wednesday the 6th inst. Dominique Ducasse, Captain and Aid-de-Camp to Gen. Dufour, Tugdual Antoine Kerenor, Lieutenant, and Julien Deslories, Ensign, three French prisoners of war at Chesterfield, were conducted from the house of correction there, by a military escort, on their way to Norman Cross Prison, for having broken their parole of honor.  The two former were apprehended at the Peacock Inn, (along with George Lawton, of Sheffield, cutler,) about 10 o’clock on Saturday night, the 26th ult. by the vigilance of Mr. Hopkinson, the landlord, who much to his credit, refused to furnish a post-chaise to carry them to Derby, and dispatched a messenger to the Commissary at Chesterfield, detaining them until the return of the messenger; the next day they were conveyed back to Chesterfield, and Lawton is now in our county gaol to take his trial for assisting in the escape. 

D5459/1/5 French Prisoners, George M. Woodward, 1783

D5459/1/5 French Prisoners, George M. Woodward, 1783

The same escort took another prisoner (Monsieur Bernier, an Ensign) from Newark, where he was recaptured, on the information of the Waiter, at the Saracen’s Head Inn, having also escaped from Chesterfield; and the Transport Board have ordered 15 guineas to be paid for the recapture of these three prisoners. 

In short, that Board have since, in consequence of the great number of escapes of French prisoners of war on parole in this kingdom, ordered that in future, the following rewards shall be paid, for recaptures, viz., 10 guineas for every commissioned officer, 5 guineas for every non-commissioned officer, and 20 guineas for every British subject convicted of assisting such prisoners to escape. 

And we are sorry to find, that this Government have lately been under the necessity of ordering the French aspirants and midshipmen on parole in this country, into close confinement in consequence of the French Government having sent the English midshipmen on parole in France, to prison, and their not releasing them though remonstrated with, by our Government; this conduct of the French Ruler, in the present situation of affairs, is too obvious to need comment.

There will be more about Napoleonic prisoners of war on the blog next Thursday.

explore-flyer (cropped)

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Ferodo and the Bullet-Proof vest

Bullet proof materials

Now then… Stop me if you have heard this one before (and if you have, it may be because you recall a flurry of press activity in the late 1990s), but did you know that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle submitted a design for a bullet-proof vest to Field Marshal Haig during the First World War? Well, he did. And it was in connection with this that Conan Doyle ordered some bullet-proof materials from Ferodo, the very successful brake-lining manufacturing company based in Chapel-en-le-Frith.

Conan_doyle

Philip Norman’s article about the sale of Conan Doyle’s personal archive in 2004 expresses the opinion that, if the device had been adopted, it “would doubtless have saved many lives”. (See http://www.sherlock-holmes.co.uk/news/doyle.html – the website is that of the Sherlock Holmes Museum, based at 221b Baker Street.)

This post is topped by a photograph of the entry in question, from the Ferodo company archive, held here (D4562/8/5). The entry is neither very informative nor very beautiful, but it is certainly interesting. And hard to read! If anybody can offer an interpretation of what the record is really telling us, we could improve our catalogue description, which currently calls the volume simply “sample report summaries 1915-1926”.

Many thanks to Will, who is here on work experience, for locating the entry, and spotting the Philip Norman article.

Troubled Times – new online exhibition now available

Long before the revolutions of the French and the Americans in the Eighteenth Century, Britain had experienced its own violent revolution that saw families split and friends divided, houses and churches destroyed, the king executed and a republic established.

This new exhibition looks at the how Derbyshire’s role in the civil war, and its impact on it, is reflected in the primary sources that have survived to this day and are currently available for consultation at the record office.

Click here to view: http://tinyurl.com/d72eucw

Our newest addition: P W Miller’s unpublished theological works

Revd Paul William Miller (1918-2000) was Canon Residentiary and Precentor at Derby Cathedral from 1966 to 1983. In his earlier life, he had been an artist, a lay brother at a monastery, a soldier in France during the Second World War, and – for four years – a Prisoner of War after being captured by the Japanese in Singapore. We have just received five volumes of his religious writings which (so far as we can tell) have never been published. If you are interested, have a look at the catalogue: http://ow.ly/8GZcx.

Harry and Monica (2)

Monica's reply to Harry

D5994/2/90: Teddington, 30 November 1940

My very Dear One,

Your surprise, your letter, your thought, and your words were so perfect – you are good to me – and I thank you with all my heart.  It is a lovely gift, one that I shall treasure always, and it looks beautiful on my dressing table.  Continue reading

Harry and Monica (1)

 

Harry's letter to Monica

 

D5994/2/87: Norwich, 24 November 1940

My Darling

            A breathless dash, an effort to race time itself finishing with that relief expressed in other and quieter days at the cinema by “Hurrah! Here come the U.S. Marines”…  Just in the nick of time as the vernacular has it.  Continue reading