Treasure 47: Plan of proposed railway to Mapperley Colliery

This treasure (Q/RP/2/207) is a plan of a proposed railway to Mapperley Colliery, submitted to the Quarter Sessions Court in 1889 by the Great Northern Railway. It shows the line between the Heanor branch and the Midland Railway branch to Mapperley Colliery.

aph-mapperley-rail-plan-02

This is one of over three hundred railway plans and books of reference in the Quarter Sessions collection – the reason we have them is that from 1792 onwards, anyone who planned to build a canal, turnpike road or railway had to deposit plans with the Clerk of the Peace for any affected county.

aph-mapperley-rail-plan-01

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Flying Scotsman Designer

Our colleague and friend Sue wrote this post about a year ago when the restoration of the Flying Scotsman had been in the news, with a statue of its designer Sir Herbert Nigel Gresley unveiled at Kings Cross Station. At the time, Sue recalled that Sir Nigel was brought up in Netherseal, the 4th son of Rev Nigel Gresley rector of Overseal and Netherseal now in Derbyshire. Here is her post:

Netherseal Census

He is listed with his family at Netherseal Rectory on the 1881 Census aged 4 above.

His family can be traced back to the Norman conquest, some say before and the Netherseal branch descended from Rev Thomas Gresley (d 1785) who lived at Netherseal Hall. Thomas had plans to rebuild the hall, living there just after the Civil War, but this did not happen as he intended. His descendant Rev William Gresley brought about some changes and extensions, after he unexpectedly inherited the baronetcy from a distant cousin in 1837. Thomas his son, chose to live at Netherseal. As the fortunes of the family diminished it was demolished in 1933.

Rev Nigel Gresley and his wife Joanna, Sir Herbert Nigel’s parents, were comfortably off as we can see from the census above, and employed a number of servants. Rev. Nigel was the 5th successive member of his family to be Rector of Netherseal and died in 1897.

Sir Nigel ‘s famous Pacific’s, of which the Flying Scotsman was the second of the later class A-1, did not appear until 1922. He also went on to design other engines notably the Mallard. We have further information about his career and the history of his family at Derbyshire Record Office.

English Heritage publish statement of historical significance about the Midland Mainline

English Heritage publish statement of historical significance about the Midland Mainline

English Heritage have just published this statement about one of our local railway lines, drawing in part on material held here in the Strutt collection (viz., sub-series D3772/E52).  It is available as a download for a limited time, although I have saved a copy to add to the record office CD collection in future.