Flying Scotsman Designer

Our colleague and friend Sue wrote this post about a year ago when the restoration of the Flying Scotsman had been in the news, with a statue of its designer Sir Herbert Nigel Gresley unveiled at Kings Cross Station. At the time, Sue recalled that Sir Nigel was brought up in Netherseal, the 4th son of Rev Nigel Gresley rector of Overseal and Netherseal now in Derbyshire. Here is her post:

Netherseal Census

He is listed with his family at Netherseal Rectory on the 1881 Census aged 4 above.

His family can be traced back to the Norman conquest, some say before and the Netherseal branch descended from Rev Thomas Gresley (d 1785) who lived at Netherseal Hall. Thomas had plans to rebuild the hall, living there just after the Civil War, but this did not happen as he intended. His descendant Rev William Gresley brought about some changes and extensions, after he unexpectedly inherited the baronetcy from a distant cousin in 1837. Thomas his son, chose to live at Netherseal. As the fortunes of the family diminished it was demolished in 1933.

Rev Nigel Gresley and his wife Joanna, Sir Herbert Nigel’s parents, were comfortably off as we can see from the census above, and employed a number of servants. Rev. Nigel was the 5th successive member of his family to be Rector of Netherseal and died in 1897.

Sir Nigel ‘s famous Pacific’s, of which the Flying Scotsman was the second of the later class A-1, did not appear until 1922. He also went on to design other engines notably the Mallard. We have further information about his career and the history of his family at Derbyshire Record Office.

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Advent Calendar – Day 15

Have you been up early this morning waiting to find out what is behind today’s door? (only joking)

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Copy. Map of Belper and Heage by John Hatton, 1698 (Ref: D369/G/Maps/15). This item is part of the series of maps collected and deposited by the Derbyshire Archaeological Society (ref: D369).

image

To the modern eye, this item may look quite unfamiliar as a map, however it is quite typical for the 17th century, when cartography and map making was an expensive business. Maps were generally produced for a very specific purpose and would therefore only include information relevant to that purpose rather than as an accurate geographic or geological representation of an area. Nevertheless this is a particularly useful map as it does include a scale in the top right corner, and many of the buildings (the sketches of which are likely to have some, though not complete, reliability with regards to the actual buildings) are accompanied by a name. I’m afraid I have not had time to look at this item, and any related records in enough detail to determine whether these names belong to the owner or occupier of each building.

For a list of more early maps of Derbyshire, including items held in other archives, please see Derbyshire Record Society’s 2012 edition of A Catalogue of Local Maps of Derbyshire c1528-1800, available in our Local Studies collection, and other libraries across the county (see the Library Catalogue for more information).

Of course you can also search the online archives catalogue for these and other maps and plans held in our archives collection. In particular, there are quite a good number of different maps for Belper, especially amongst the Strutt estate collections (ref: D1564, D3772).

If you are interested in old maps generally, there is a beautiful example amongst our 50 Treasures – Treasure 8: the Gresley processional map And don’t forget, you can nominate an item from our archives and local studies collection (or even a series or collection of items) for the 50 Treasures.

Treasure 8: the Gresley processional map

This ‘Procession Way’ plan of the Seale Estate (D77/8/10) dates from the 16th or possibly early 17th century and is from the papers of the Gresley family of Drakelow.  Centred on the area of Potter’s Wood, with Netherseale to the south, Rosliston to the north, Lullington to the west, and Seale Grange to the south-west.

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It was chosen by our colleague Anne, who says “I particularly like the little houses, gates and trees – being drawn in three dimensions, they’re not just a flat image on a page.”