On This Day: ‘Advertisements’

From the Derby Mercury, 20th November 1767:

Advertisements.

INOCULATION

BELLINGHAM the Elder, is come from Coventry, and proposes residing for some Time at Derby, to attend all proper Subjects that offer for Inoculation of the Small Pox, in the New Method.

He has already given Proofs in this Town, that this once dreadful Disorder may be now got over without the least Confinement, or Shadow of Danger.  

He is at present at the Saracen’s-Head in Derby, and all Letters directed there will be punctually answered.

Mr. and Mrs. DENBY,

Take the Liberty to acquaint the PUBLIC,

THAT as their House in St. MARY-GATE, proves too small for the continuation of their Boarding School for young Ladies, they shall at Christmas next remove to a larger, and more convenient House in All-Saints Church Yard; where, those Ladies committed to their Charge shall, with the utmost Care and Tenderness, be instructed in the following Articles of Learning.

READING, all Sorts of NEEDLE-WORK, and so much of GEOGRAPHY as will illustrate and promote the Reading of History; together with their Board at Sixteen Pounds a Year, and a Guinea Entrance.

MUSIC, DANCING, WRITING, DRAWING, and FRENCH, taught by able Masters.

The County Local Studies Library holds the Derby Mercury – just ring to book a microfilm reader.

Derbyshire Literature Festival May 2012

May was a busy month for our outreach team as this was the first year that the Record Office took part in the Derbyshire Literature Festival. This was the 7th Derbyshire Literature festival organised by Derbyshire County Council which takes place every two years, and this year’s programme was exciting as ever, with more than 65 events happening in libraries and other venues across the county.

The Record Office contributed 3 events to the programme:

                                   ‘Ask the Archivist’

Glapwell Deed from 13th Century

An open day for those interested in historical research, whether it was advice on how to get started or how to get to the next step.  We had a great display of original material from our collections for visitors to read and we were very keen, as in all our events, to give people the opportunity to get hands on with the documents.  In this display we included material showing the range of material we hold, from prisoner records to a letter from Florence Nightingale, and our oldest records (we think!) a deed dating c. 1115.

‘Melbourne in the Archives’

Reading a 19th century Phrenology report out aloud from the original manuscript

An exhibition of historical records from the John Joseph Briggs collection (an author, poet, naturalist & historian from Melbourne) with the chance to read aloud from a selection of material from the exhibition and discuss and talk about the material. 

The exhibition featured letters, extracts, books, poems & illustrations concerning Melbourne local history.  The originals were on display and used during the read aloud session, which was enjoyed by all, and led to a relaxed and interesting group discussion.

Illustrations from a scrapbook found in the Briggs collection

 

 We received some lovely comments:

‘The event was excellent.  The staff were warm & friendly & knowledgeable; it was a privilege to see original documents; the readings were a special treat as was meeting local people’

 

 

 

‘Reading and Writing from the Archives with Sara Sheridan’

Looking at a late 19th century Asylum record to inspire creative writing or historical fiction

This session focused on how writers might use archive material as inspiration for creative writing and comprised of a full day of workshops, talks and activities.  We took along a large amount of original material, which provided examples of how you might use archives for writing, whether that was for characters or events, for accuracy, or what was like to live at that time – archives enabling writers to be authentic and true to the period. 

Participants were encouraged to use the documents to answer questions on how they might use the material and how to interpret them. We also had activities including guessing a mystery document, and using images from Picture the Past to inspire ideas for stories or poems. 

Following the Record Office session we had a workshop by the author Sara Sheridan who had come down from Edinburgh for the event.  Sara gave an extremely engaging talk on how she used archive material in her writing, and gave advice to the participants (most of whom were writing their own works) about how to write effectively for publication.

More information about Sara’s writing can be found on her website: http://www.sarasheridan.com/

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Smedley, Duesbury and the football

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D6808/3/1: St Andrew’s Middle Class School, Derby, April 14th, 1882

[Pupils who fell foul of this school’s laws had to submit written apologies to the headmaster – here are two, about the same incident]

 Dear Sir,

Somebody told me that Sharp had a ball, so I asked him to put it down.  Smedley then said if he did, he (Smedley) would throw it over the wall.  Continue reading

New accession of educational records

Two new accessions that might interest anyone into educational history: the minutes of the Marston Montgomery School Board from 1888 to 1903, and the Sudbury District Education Committee from 1918 to 1923. School Boards were abolished after legislative changes in 1902, and the County Council decided to disband the Sudbury committee in 1923, so each volume covers the terminal phase of the body’s history. They are public records but had found their way into private hands, as sometimes happens. Happily, the historically-minded person who came across them donated them to us, so they are back in the public domain. They are yet to be catalogued but will have references D7413 and D7414.

Sports Day photographs

We already have a substantial collection relating to St James Church of England School in Derby (collection D6560). This has been augmented in the past few days by a display board showing photographs of the annual sports day in 1924: tug o’ war, the sack race and all the rest. Some conservation work is required, but we should at least have a scanned copy available for use in the search room in the next few weeks – and if you can’t wait that long, give us a ring (01629 538347) and we can get it out specially for you!