Another day in the life of…

I may have been a bit eager to get the next instalment of ‘a day in the life of…’ written, as back at the beginning of November I did promise that another would follow in December, well we’ve hit 1 December so here it is.

It felt like we probably had an ever so slightly busier day yesterday than last time, with more customers visiting the search room (and local studies who I know had a very busy yesterday). However, as I looked back at our statistics we didn’t actually retrieve as many documents from the stores as the previous day I blogged about. It is often the case that more people in the search room does not necessarily mean more documents being requested (and vice versa with fewer people and a higher number of document orders) – this usually depends on the documents themselves and the information they contain, for example is it a document that is quick to look at or needs some time to be read and considered. Yesterday, the main reason for difference is that three of the customers each spent a few hours in the search room, looking at only two documents each. Although not all working together, they were all consulting the documents in great detail in order to make accurate transcripts that can then be used to obtain the same information without necessarily consulting the original document – which also helps us to protect the document by reducing handling.

We also had visits from people researching the geography and buildings in Duffield, two colleagues from the Legal Services team investigating the history and status of a particular road in the Peak District (see them hard at work below), a regular customer and researcher with various interests, this time looking at Methodist records, a new customer looking for an ancestor in the school admission register, as well as others who have visited for reasons that I do not know…

As before, here are the rest of my snaps from the day showing the range of resources used (click on an image for a full description)

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More creativity at Belper Library as part of Discovery Days

As part of this year’s Discovery Days, children and parents came to Belper Library to re-create their family trees – find out about the last few days of events as part of the Discovery Days festival at www.derwentvalleymills.org/index.php/discovery-days/408-discovery-days-2013

More from The Friends of the Ecclesbourne Way: Wirksworth meeting

This advertisement comes from a voluntary organisation that is just getting itself established. As ever, we are happy to spread the word…

1

Discover this viewpoint from where you can see more than a thousand years of Wirksworth’s History

Several disparate groups including the Ramblers’ Association have come together to promote a waymarked, leafleted walking route. Almost entirely over existing rights of way it runs for 20km from Wirksworth to Duffield along the beautiful but strangely underappreciated Ecclesbourne Valley.

2

The highlight of the walk will be a spur climbing incomparable Alport Height with its unrivalled views. Sometimes you can see the Wrekin (Shropshire) 85km distant. The Friends have been formed to bring this project to fruition & are working closely with the National Trust to improve access.

Gratefully rest from your walk and be served in the lodgings of a fairy tale animal alongside an eighteenth century turnpike.

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We aim not only to enhance the pleasure of walking but to encourage children to enjoy & learn from the countryside.

Meet us in the original assembly rooms of the handsome coaching inn overlooking Wirksworth’s historic market place, the Red Lion Hotel Wirksworth 1915 for 1930 on Monday 12 August. Or contact John.Morrissey2@BTopenworld.com

The Friends of the Ecclesbourne Way need YOU!

Wrekin distantly seen from Alport Height (top centre)

Derbyshire Record Office have received the following communication and are pleased, as ever, to pass the word on:

“The Friends of the Ecclesbourne Way need YOU!”

Did you know that:

Duffield was the headquarters of an extensive Royal Forest & that its traces can still be made out as we walk in our local countryside?

From Alport Height you can see the Wrekin (Shropshire) 85km away? (see picture)

That limestone was laid down in huge amounts & in very pure form when the future Wirksworth was still south of the equator & underwater?

Several disparate groups including the RA have come together to promote a waymarked, leafleted walking route.

Almost entirely over existing rights of way it runs for 18km along the beautiful but strangely underappreciated Ecclesbourne Valley.

We aim not only to enhance the pleasure of walking here but to encourage children to enjoy & learn from the countryside.

The highlight of the walk will be a spur climbing incomparable Alport Height with its unrivalled views.

The Friends have been formed to bring this project to fruition & are working closely with the National Trust to improve access there.

Come to our first public meeting, at the Patternmakers Arms Duffield

1915 for 1930 on Thursday 18 July