PC & the Pedal Crankers ‘flying the flag for Great British Cycling’

Whilst researching for our forthcoming ‘Have bike, will travel’ exhibition, I came across a reference to an ‘audio disc’ featuring a song by ‘PC & the Pedal Crankers’ which turned out to be a 7inch single featuring the songs ‘Ride Your Bicycle’ and ‘The Bike Ride Song.’

The only information we have is that it was for a Derby Police charity bike ride event in 1987, and that  PC & the Pedal Crankers were Kevin Jackson, Keith Jackson, Carole Jackson and Trevor Coakley.  It was produced by Mick Vaughan and recorded at Network Studios, Nottingham.

It would be fantastic to find out more, and having had a listen, it’s upbeat, catchy and clever enough to be due a re-release – it’s certainly music to put a smile on your face! In the light of the increase in cycling and events like Eroica Britannia, the Aviva Women’s Tour and the Tour of Britain visiting Derbyshire, it’d probably be a very well received ditty…as the tagline on the record says it’s “Flying the Flag for Great British Cycling.”

If anyone knows anything about the single, or the event it was made for, please get in touch!

‘Have bike, will travel’ starts on Thursday 5th May, simply turn up and you can view our cycling related Local Studies and Archive items in our Reception area.

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On This Day: ‘Velocipedes’

From the Buxton Advertiser, 28 August 1869:

VELOCIPEDES

On Thursday night about 9pm there was a disturbance in Spring Gardens, caused by the velocipede riders.  T. Widdowson, blacksmith, met and upset a velocipede, whereupon the whole of the brigade came down upon him, threatening vengeance.  Widdowson was obliged to obtain the assistance of neighbours and police to protect him from his excited assailants.  It appears strange to us that the authorities do not attempt to abate this velocipede mania.  After dark the streets are not safe, the velocipedes interfering with the comfort and safety of everybody.

The County Local Studies Library holds the Buxton Advertiser from 1855-1879 – just ring to book a microfilm reader.