‘Is there any post?’ -FitzHerbert project catch up

The FitzHerbert project has been quiet for some time so I wanted to write a catch up blog to update you on progress and share with you one of the highlights of the collection.

Firstly, I want to mention the title of the post: this is surely a familiar phrase in every British household. Especially with the increase in email usage there is always a keen sense of anticipation when you are expecting something to arrive in the post, especially a letter. When something arrives unexpectedly it is always exciting (except if it’s from the bank!). Continue reading

Mini Explore: ‘Coal not Dole!’

Coal not dole poster

Until the last decade, coal mining was once one of the biggest industries in the East Midlands, especially in Derbyshire which had many mining communities when the industry was at its height.

Just a few of months ago, the UK’s last deep pit coal mine closed for the last time. Another deep pit mine will close in December (Kellingley, in North Yorkshire) and after this there will be no more deep pit mines in the UK.

This is of particular historical significance because it reflects the changing nature of British industries and economy. There is also an underlying theme about workers rights which originates from the Magna Carta.

Employment rights, equal pay, fair working conditions and the right to protest have featured heavily in the loss of the mining industry. Over the centuries they have developed to become apparent features of human rights, which have evolved from the original Magna Carta clauses. Because of the impact of Magna Carta over the course of history, it remains our democratic right to be able to protest for fair employment rights.

This featured poster with the slogan ‘Coal not Dole!’ (D5756/5-7) was issued by the National Union of Mineworkers during the Miners’ Strike in 1984-85. Although not overly exciting to look at, it deals with the point relating to workers rights and employment. Perhaps it reminds you of this event?

A few months ago a blog was published about the Magna Carta as part of the Mini Explore Your Archive campaign. This year’s main Explore Your Archive week starts this Saturday.

For this year’s event we are welcoming poet and designer Jane Weir to the record office to talk about her work, inspired by archive collections.  To find out more about this free event or to book a place go to the Events page on our blog (just scroll back to the top of this page).

Key players in the FitzHerbert Family

When you’re cataloguing a large family collection such as this, it’s fair to say there’s always a large number of people involved! The FitzHerbert family is no exception and throughout the listing process where I’ve been looking through all of the material in all the boxes (see my earlier posts), there is certainly a large amount of correspondence.

Some of this correspondence is business related, regarding the Tissington estate (also some of the other estates), Whilst some of the correspondence is private, between friends and family about a whole array of subjects.

This adds to the already catalogued material of this collection and fills what would otherwise be an incomplete gap. Take a look at the catalogue for collection D239 here.It also gives an insight into the lives and personalities of those who are writing the letters. Given that the material in these particular boxes dates rom the late eighteenth century to the 1960s, it is four of the FitzHerbert Baronets who are the main authors of the letters, the 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th Baronets: Sir William, Sir Richard, Sir Hugo Meynell and Sir William.

Including friends and workers on the Tissington Estate, they correspond with some interesting people, Edward Ford being one significant individual. A gentleman called Col. Weetman is a name frequently mentioned, he was an insurance agent for the FitzHerberts. Why not come and read the correspondence when its all sorted and properly catalogued?

In my next post I hope to tell you about some of the items I’ve discovered which are ‘treasures’…

Progress and Travelling thoughts

Its now mid-June and we’ve already had two Bank Holidays in the last month. The weather is getting warmer (hopefully!) and the days are getting longer. Can you guess where I’m going with this? Yes, the holiday season will soon be upon us and for many of us that means we will be dusting off a very important document which enables us to travel abroad – the passport.

In 1846, Sir William FitzHerbert, 4th Baronet of Tissington, travelled briefly abroad and the images below are of his passport which was issued to him for doing so. You can see what it looks like as well as the fold out page that is the offical document. It is notable that it is more ‘low-tech’ than the passports we have today! You can read more about the history of passports on Wikipedia. Some brief notes mention that he went to Hamburg, now a city in Germany, but which was then a fully independent state.

I’m making steady progress with the catalogue. Now everything in each box has been listed I have entered all the information into an excel spreadsheet, which should be completed shortly. I am doing this in accordance with ISAD(G), the international standard for cataloguing archive collections which ensures consistency. The next step is to go through the data again and give each item a reference number, before expanding on some of the descriptions.

I’ll let you know how I’m getting on in the next post.

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Saying Hello

My name is Frances Lund and I’ve been volunteering at Derbyshire Record Office for the last two weeks now, although it feels like longer than that! I’m actually a qualified archivist and am developing my skills whilst looking for my next employment opportunity which is why I’m volunteering. The task I’ve been working on so far is an accession of material which belongs to the FitzHerbert Family of Tissington. You can find out more about this collection here. There are twenty boxes of material, of which I have surveyed the contents to establish what there is and where it fits into the collection. This is somewhat unusual as long time users and researchers will note that this collection is otherwise already fully catalogued! The next step is to finalise the box list and create a theoretical catalogue, before importing it all into CALM. I’ll also be posting some photos of what I think are the most interesting items over the next few weeks so keep following if you’d like to find out more.