Handmade in Derbyshire

September’s promotion across Derbyshire Libraries is ‘Arts and Crafts’ so what better time to remind you about the latest exhibition on show at the Record Office. Displayed at reception are examples of work from just some of the wonderful artists we have here in Derbyshire.IMG_9421

You can see work by Jane Bevan.  Jane is an artist with a passion for English woodlands.  Walking and exploring daily amongst ancient trees near her home she gathers interesting and eye catching materials to carry home and transform into artworks. The thorns, fragments of bark, seeds, feathers and acorn cups which are her treasured, seasonal finds, are celebrated in Jane’s work, often because of their tiny imperfections and irregularities. The materials are hand-stitched, tied and intricately assembled into vessels, sculptures and 2D collage.

Another artist whose works use items from nature are those by Rosalind Pounder.  On display you can see 100 nests made from found garden material placed in a box covered with found and handmade paper, and 7 handmade books dyed with Elderberry, Rowan, Blackberry and Hornbeam sewn with waste cotton thread.

Continuing with the book theme Maggie Cullen has pieces developed from discarded copies of novels written by famous authors illustrating their affectionate connection with Derbyshire. Delicate paper figures grow from the book linked to the transitory nature of ideas embodied in the works.  She uses book paper to create each piece and hopefully contributes to the continued life of a discarded book.

Representing the world of ceramics Ann Bates explores the use of oxides and carbonates to colour her clay.  ‘Land Layers’ is a series of vessel forms made from stoneware clays interspersed with coloured porcelain, and echoes the asymmetry of rocks, earth and sky through the differing width bands, colours and texture of the material.

An old friend of the Record office, Paula Moss was Artist in Residence from 2012 to 2014. Her teapot, tankard and commemorative Plate using ceramic and digital print, was commissioned for the exhibition ‘The Coal Age’ by Excite Inspire Engage Erewash project. These pieces pay homage to the work of the Mines Rescue Service.

Wendy Johnson makes a range of functional and decorative pieces. All of her work is hand built using slab, pinched, press moulding and modelling techniques. Her range includes decorative clocks, candlesticks, bowls, teapots, cups and jugs. Wendy also makes wall mounted and freestanding boxes with narrative, enjoying the playful individual nature of the pieces, each telling its own story.

Dave Turner is a traditionally trained artist/blacksmith and although using centuries-old techniques his work is both contemporary and traditional. Using his smithing background Dave produces pieces in forged iron and with his artistic background make beautiful pieces of sculpture.

IMG_9422Finally local glass makers from Lumsdale demonstrate age old techniques to create beautiful bespoke pieces of handmade, lead crystal glass.  New to the glass scene, Jonathan Abbott makes a variety of work influenced by simple Scandinavian design.  He uses plain colours and simple patterns to create vases, bowls, oil burners and paperweights.

Anthony Wassell has been working in glass since 1974.  His Delta series of bowls, vases, plates and triangular stoppered bottles are blown with one or more layers of coloured glass and a layer of clear glass. The design is then cut through the different layers of glass.

The ‘Handmade in Derbyshire’ exhibition is truly beautiful. On until 7th January, come along and see for yourself.

 

 

 

 

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